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friend, he and i have been together and political offices, a government responsibility for a very long time. more than three years. when he decided not to run again and my other colleague who was part of team north dakota was defeated, it was less rewarding for me personally to be here. less enjoyable for me to be here. i am sure that played a role. >> in your speech yesterday, you used the expression of the senate we efforts right yesterday, as the world's greatest deliberative body. do you think the public shares that perception? >> probably not. [laughter] we're efficient at producing results. -- deficient at producing results. what i also said yesterday was a there are problems here. the problems i believe are very clear is that we spend too much time trying to seek political advantage, too little time focused on solving the country's problems. i am sure that had a role in my decision as well. i really came here wanting to do big things. wanted to work on solving problems. there is been much less an emphasis on that lately and much more of an emphasis on how you get over on the oth
. back in 2003, i got medicaid payments by the government to help the state's struggling with their medicaid costs. $20 billion will able to spread across the states to help them because they were unable to meet the rising costs. in 2017, they're going to have a larger share of the costs. we need that is taken care of. they did not know what the cost was. they put a number in as a place holder and it looked like i was doing something for my state when i wasn't. i was trying to get it for all the states. that is what happened. i wanted to get it knocked out -- if people wanted an opt out. the supreme court gave that. this got used against me as though i was trying to do something i should not have. i was not. the interesting thing is i was asked to do this by the nebraska governor. i did not get a thank you from another governor, who was from another state. >> during that time, you experienced the radio talk-show host circuit and the cable tv circuit. what was that time like and what do you think the echo chamber in american politics today does? >> it is a difficult thing
. the government gets the money from us. i do not see how they have the right to sit there and play politics with each other and try to make decisions that are going to just benefit them. maybe a small part of the population. this is the united states. we're supposed to be tried to help everybody. we cannot be scared of what is clear to happen to us when many people are barely able to meet their bills. they may have to be afraid of what is going to happen to them. what kind of government would do that to their people? they should try to make us feel calm. like we are really going to get something done. host: from crawford, indiana this morning. on twitter -- another tweet i want to read this morning -- jodi wrtes in -- we will be taking your calls all of this morning for this segment and the next segment on the "washington journal." we told you what was going on in the senate. here is "roll-call" newspaper and what is being prepped in the house today -- alan ota writes, the speaker made it clear -- that is what is going on in the house. let's go to charles on a republican line from maryland.
a social security, medicare, medicaid. that is not the only entitlements. every government program that has a retirement benefit, a health-care benefit, those are entitlements, two, up to and including the entitlements for the congressman. let's be fair. when they start talking about entitlements and hold it to those three items, let's hold their feet to the fire and make them talk about entitlements for the other folks, too. host: appreciate you calling this morning. donna writes about this on twitter. if that to facebook here. -- back to you facebook here. budget showdown hits the keep week. that is of the front page reminding us of the deadline looming. it is a bloomberg story here out of the district. i you can watch the byplay here on the c-span that works with the president heading back to town tonight. the senate and house are due back tomorrow. billy from jacksonville, florida, to life for waiting. caller: i am very optimistic but i worry that the president will not get a chance because lindsey gramm already stated he will fight. i think there will already be another big fight for t
originally called in response to set oralism in government, which i prefer -- secularism in government, which are for. a country which invites everyone into it, all religions and nationalities, must by definition be secular. any religious direction we choose is going to favor somebody, and i thought that is what we were trying to avoid. at least i thought that is what jefferson meant when he talked about religious freedoms. host: ok. caller: freedom from religion. host: when you go to vote in a presidential election or congressional election, what are the big factors in your decision? caller: usually economic. i did not consider -- i don't consider religion unless it interferes with some legislation. it plays a very little role in my life. host: would you call yourself unaffiliated religiously? caller: relatively i am an atheist. so, yes, i am unaffiliated. host: here is the "christian science monitor," their cover. the new face of faith. what is happening in new england, the countries most secular region, may have a future of american religion. traditional religions are seeing their ranks th
a denunciation of big government liberalism or big government programs. you can see his anti-communism is evolving, his cultural view is evolving. he has not yet gained or acquired the tax-cut philosophy which fit so nicely into his optimistic outlook of empowering individuals to determine their own lives. >> saturday night at 8:00 eastern, craig shirley on the political campaigns of ronald reagan, part of four days of american history tv, right through new year's day, on c- span3. >> you think of washington before the civil war. you think slavery was well entrenched. black people were miserable. that is not true at all. in washington, washington had about 30,000 people as a city. 12,000 of them were black. the majority free, no slaves. >> what led to the first race riots? jefferson morley recounts what happened, part of what today's through new year's day on c- span2's book tv. >> "washington journal" continues. host: damian paletta join us here at the table. thank you for joining us. this is the fourth time that congress has had a post- christmas lame duck session. what doe
the government can just let people build and build and build without some sort. of sort host: thank you. guest: you make a good point, but urban development in florida occupies 10% of the state. most of the -- most of the everglades is protected by state parks. if people want to protect more land, they could buy land and put it under conservation easily, but there is plenty of land available sphere without impacting the everglades in the awkward first. to say that we should confine people to 10% of the state, when you have one of the 3 or four most heavily populated states, means you are seeing newcomers are not welcome, existing renters can not buy houses, our children cannot buy houses. that is not the american dream, to stand in the way of our future. host: the book is entitled "american nightmare -- how government undermines the dream of homeownership. this is from drake cinders -- what land use restrictions would you approve of? guest: a buy support local homeowners imposing their own -- i would support local homeowners' imposing their own restrictions. this is how it works in houston, w
-span would have more programs dealing with all of the options that could lessen the burden on the government and the taxpayer for the medical costs. i believe that in medicare buy- in -- i have 10 years left to go until medicare. i pay $620 a month for my health care. that is a lot of money. i would give that to the government and would usn't use t $100 or $200 a year. host: that is an important issue. we will focus more as the affordable care act t kicks in. for the suggestion -- thank you for the suggestion. the deficit is close to $16.4 trillion. this is part of the debate we will see at the start of the new congress. the so-called fiscal cliff was coined by ben bernanke. the story from "roll call." "it could be reached over this weekend." were heard from the house rules committee chairman yesterday. they are taking steps in advance to extend these tax cuts. a deal could be on the floor today if there is an agreement. from "the washington times" this morning. "offers fly, but still no agreement" is the headline. mitch mcconnell bypassed senator reid to speak directly to the vice president
bit of fear into these people. it just shows the control the wealthy have over the government in both parties. host: more from "the washington post." they write -- back to the telephones. derrick from maryland on the line for democrats. your thoughts about the fiscal clause bill. caller: i think they will do a good deal if they can keep mitch mcconnell out of there. one of the things i really have a problem with, that is when thing i say democrats, let's get the ground game for 2014. republicansd of the at enter the house. let's take the house and just ran it all down their throats. host: we will move onto glen on the line for independents. caller: here is the problem that we have a. we have people that are working hard for the american people. we have a constitution. we have deviated from the constitution. host: who are the people working hard for the american people? caller: the american citizens. it takes two american citizens -- your mother and father have to be american citizens to be the president of the united states. we need to have a confirmation hearing. on the birth certifi
] to listen to your -- [inaudible] and translate your views to the hard work of government. your meeting today will be young people ato -- the opportunity to debate issues that -- [inaudible] it's a big thing. i wish you the latest -- [inaudible] i look forward to hearing your debates. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for reading that. that is a delight to have the prime minister's support. i now call to say some words to us, the leader of the house of commons. mr. andrew. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. [applause] thank you, mr. speaker. members of the you'll parking lotment, i'm debated to -- that righted to welcome you for the fourth annual sitting. the sitting have become an accomplished part of the parking parliament calendar. -- they have become so well established. and leader of the house, i am the representative of the government to this house of commons. and of the house of commons to the government. but today i am pleased to be able to be here to representative both the government and the house with you the youth parliament. i know, what is said here today will be heard both
't he accepting it ne fuel? >> it would cause drawing up laws to govern what the pressure should do. this really was a question of the heart of all of this. how could you make sure that everybody was involvinged incluesing publishers that aren't to do so without the piece of legislation that would amount enemies of the system sucting to licensing. the law had to change. talks use similar language that would simply recognize an independent regulator in raw. this debate went for months and months and months. they were joined. it would billion far more something more owneress. that's what david cameron was addressing in some of of his concerns. how did it feel? >> we saw something rather by zard there. we heard from the two men, the prime minister and the deputy frimse. there were -- separation. one of those two men thinks new law is skential and the other not is not. >> in the backgrounds for a moment, you've got the last few months. will continue to cross party talks. but simultaneously you also god the crime city. try now that new regulator could be brought in into this new law if i
geithner. it could delay the tax filings. the government relies on august revenue to come in and it usually comes flooding in during march and april. people need to pay their taxes, but they don't know which tax rules will apply. host: the other deadline is the debt limit. here at $16.4 trillion. guest: >> the treasury department can stop funding federal pensions and do some other maneuvers, essentially to buy them another six weeks of time. we all at this last year. closer they get to that is when financial markets will start going crazy. the debates we are having now about tax and spending will likely be the same debates we are having six weeks from now. host: there's the u.s. debt clock. you can also see how much that is for individuals and what protection is moving ahead. our guest is damian paletta of the wall street journal. the covers finances and congress and the white house. his work is available online. from the senate floor yesterday, these comments by the senate democratic leader harry reid. [video clip] >> the speakership all members of the house back to washington today. he sh
." arnold, you have struck our hearts and minds. today, your government, your fellow citizens are going to strike the gold medal for you. congratulations. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please remain seated for the unveiling and presentation of the congressional gold medal by members of united states congress. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, mr. arnold palmer. [applause] >> thank you. mr. speaker, members of congress, reverend clergy, ladies and gentlemen. this is not my first time, so bear with me a little bit. i prepare this wonderful occasion, and i thought about what a thrill it was last time i had the opportunity to address congress in these halls. that was in 1990. on the 100th anniversary of the birthday of president and general dwight eisenhower. i was fortunate enough to have had a warm and rewarding french ship -- friendship with the president, and the last of his years were wonderful. we enjoyed a little golf and a lot of fun. it was a great honor to be able to be with him, a great american. he was that. it was a pleasure for me to spend some time with him. i have had s
our government is trying to do with the bickering and tearing each other down, tearing the country down. why in the world can these supposedly intelligent groups of men and women not get together to work out for the best interest of all concerned, all 330 billion americans, what is the best course to take? just take it. none of this squabbling. get together, folks. let's have some harmony in warrington. that is what we need. we need more on selfishness. a lot less ulterior motives. no more 2000 page bills that no one can understand. we do not need more of that crap in washington. we need some representation. get your act together. >> we are going next to minneapolis, minnesota. john, welcome. >> all of this gridlock going on right now, what is clearly evident to me is that the republican party has pure interests in mind. they're willing to touch medicare and social security, but not their own salaries, no steps against their own party to take the needs of the american people. how can you act together with a party that works purely for their own interests. my question is -- what can
for anyone looking to become more familiar with how government works and the ins and outs of capitol hill. >> julie seger on c-span on verizon. c-span has been brought to you by your television provider as a public service. >> next, it is a global look at the economy with a speech by greek economist. among his many books, the economics professor recently minotaur" andobal natar we will show you as much as we can before the house gavels in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, france, -- friends, this is a singular honor to be a guest in this temple of civic life. thanks to all the good people for making this possible, to my publisher, the staff that are manning the barricades outside. my novel is debt crisis and the future of the world economy. i will be arguing that there is no such thing as a debt crisis. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some p
to the federal budget, how big is the federal budget? how much money does the government take in? how much do we spend? how much is $167 trillion for the current debt? guest: spending this year will be $33.8 trillion. the deficit of about $1 trillion that is for fiscal 2013. that assumes that somehow the fiscal cliff doesn't happen and we don't reduce the deficit by $600 billion. national debt, about $16 billion , debt held by the public -- as a percentage it is getting up there. we've had it before. as we talked about two weeks ago it is not so much that the size of the debt it is how fast the debt is growing in comparison to the size of the economy. you don't want to pay off the debt but you want it to fall. host: how did we get to this point? why is the government spending so much and under this president, we've seen the debt go up $1 trillion each year over the last four years. where is it going? guest: there are two main ways to look at it. right now, we're still coming out of this economic crisis. so you have large debts for four years mainly because you have low revenues as people don't h
brings. today, we gather in this hallowed temple to representative government dedicated to the enjoyment of life and its blessings by its citizens, to honor aung san suu kyi. we are honored by her presence and her heroic witness to the dignity of each person, most especially in her native land of burma. her story is known to all, her example among the greatest of our time, of all time. we ask that as we come together to honor her, you bless our gathering. may we all be emboldened to give of our life as she has done, to stand up for human freedom wherever it may be denied. and bless her most noble of causes. move the hearts of those who would deny freedom to her and to the people of burma. may our actions today add to the universal out cry for justice and freedom so that the blessings of life will burst forth for the citizens of aung san suu kyi's need of burma. -- native burma. god bless the nation of burma and bless the united states of america. amen. >> please be seated. >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable joseph crowley, representative of the seventh district of new york. >> thank
-- it will not be any more government bonds because we will be out of the debt situation. we saw it on the horizon. when george w. bush became president, he decided to go back on rates across the board to the wealthiest to the middle to the poor and he put to ban all wars on a credit card and we are where we are -- to banwo isa credit card and here we are. we are coming out of the worst recession since the great depression. it has been difficult -- led by unfortunately some unscrupulous people on wall street who created a nightmare in the housing market. i remember saying to treasury secretary paulson, can you please explain the role of derivative ofs to me and what happened and how we got into this crisis? he put his head in his hands and he said, not now, i will talk to you later. that is not a very encouraging thing when the secretary of the treasury puts his head in his hands and says, i cannot explain it now. we are coming out of this difficult time and, guess what, we are doing much better. we had an election. it was pretty clear people want to see us reach a balance here. so, as i stand here, i k
like contractors that have been contracting with the federal government to replace the shuttle? and could you comment on where the commercial space ports of the future will be located? >> well, for suborbital manned spaceflight, they can use any airport with a 12,000 foot runway. branson is considering doing it in an isolated place in new mexico. i tried to talk him into doing it in a place where there is an ocean and something worth looking. at any rate, his plan to put spaceports in five or six different countries, he wants to do one or you can let people see the northern lights during your space flight. so he has some really neat ideas about where it could be done. when you look at where funds are available for a space port, there is one planned in dubai. there is not one affordable enough to fly into orbit, so i suggest that we had better solve that problem and then think about what a space port would look like. >> your thoughts on using model aviation as a funnel for youth to get into aircraft engineering, because your friends at the faa are trying to lump us then with the
government and our policies active instead of bureaucratic and flat. that is why i look for in people. i look for that energy. >> thank you, you have a lot of energy, secretary hilda solis, we're glad you came. [applause] c-span3 c-span2 >> by the time i was 9 years old, was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy and then i broke with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay who is running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party to work for him i was handed out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was cute, this little boy handing out leaflets and chest and why and i made the case for john lindsay and got an early start on my political consulting career and made the case against his opponent as well. she said that is so cute and she handed me a box of pastry, a white box with string, and it took a back to the liberal party headquarters and we opened it up and there was all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. in one of my early lessons and politics, the district's lawyer grabbed the mom -- grab the money and said you can keep the
played the game." arnold, you have struck our hearts and minds. today, your government, your fellow citizens are going to strike the gold medal for you. congratulations. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please remain seated for the unveiling and presentation of the congressional gold medal by members of united states congress. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, mr. arnold palmer. [applause] >> thank you. mr. speaker, members of congress, reverend clergy, ladies and gentlemen. this is not my first time, so bear with me a little bit. i prepare this wonderful occasion, and i thought about what a thrill it was last time i had the opportunity to address congress in these halls. that was in 1990. on the 100th anniversary of the birthday of president and general dwight eisenhower. i was fortunate enough to have had a warm and rewarding french ship -- friendship with the president, and the last of his years were wonderful. we enjoyed a little golf and a lot of fun. it was a great honor to be able to be with him, a great american. he was that. it was a pleasure for me to spend some time wit
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)